Loading Selected Work...
Menu

{Everyday Inspiration} A good day for a circus…

One of my all time favorite artists is Alexander Calder. While he was probably best known for his mobile sculptures (he coined the word “mobile”), he also had a lifetime love of the circus.  One of his early jobs as an illustrator for the National Police Gazette, sent him to the Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus to sketch circus scenes for 2 weeks in 1925. Later when he moved to Paris (1926) he created “Cirque Calder”. All the pieces were small enough to be packed in a small trunk which allowed him to take it with him places and have impromptu circus performances. They usually lasted for about 2 hours and were very elaborate. Every now and then I like to watch this video & thumb through my Calder books for inspiration. I thought today would be a good day for an impromptu circus performance here (only 5minutes rather than 2 hours). Hope you enjoyed it! 

Photos via: herehere, & here

{Everyday Inspiration} A good day for a circus…

One of my all time favorite artists is Alexander Calder. While he was probably best known for his mobile sculptures (he coined the word “mobile”), he also had a lifetime love of the circus.  One of his early jobs as an illustrator for the National Police Gazette, sent him to the Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus to sketch circus scenes for 2 weeks in 1925. Later when he moved to Paris (1926) he created “Cirque Calder”. All the pieces were small enough to be packed in a small trunk which allowed him to take it with him places and have impromptu circus performances. They usually lasted for about 2 hours and were very elaborate. Every now and then I like to watch this video & thumb through my Calder books for inspiration. I thought today would be a good day for an impromptu circus performance here (only 5minutes rather than 2 hours). Hope you enjoyed it! 

Photos via: herehere, & here

{Everyday Inspiration} A good day for a circus…

One of my all time favorite artists is Alexander Calder. While he was probably best known for his mobile sculptures (he coined the word “mobile”), he also had a lifetime love of the circus.  One of his early jobs as an illustrator for the National Police Gazette, sent him to the Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus to sketch circus scenes for 2 weeks in 1925. Later when he moved to Paris (1926) he created “Cirque Calder”. All the pieces were small enough to be packed in a small trunk which allowed him to take it with him places and have impromptu circus performances. They usually lasted for about 2 hours and were very elaborate. Every now and then I like to watch this video & thumb through my Calder books for inspiration. I thought today would be a good day for an impromptu circus performance here (only 5minutes rather than 2 hours). Hope you enjoyed it! 

Photos via: herehere, & here